Lauch of the photobook "Finding Ourselves"

 

On 27 December 2013, CCRD in partnership with Save living Co, Ltd launched the photo book "Finding Ourselves" at Closet club, No 1 Cua Dong, Hanoi, Vietnam.
This photo book is made to disseminate the results of the research study“Alcohol abuse, stigma and sexual risks: triple burden among MSM in Hanoi, Vietnam” conducted by Centre for Community Health Research and Development (CCRD) in 2011 with support from the Research 2 Prevention (R2P) project.
Introduction
This photo book presents the true-life stories of MSM living in Hanoi, Vietnam. In sharing their struggles and triumphs, they provide insight into the ways in which stigma, alcohol abuse, and unsafe sexual behavior can affect the lives of MSM.
“Finding ourselves” will take you through the journey of six men, from the moment they recognized their sexual orientation until they dared to come out to live as what they were born. Today, they live and work as any other member of society, and they have learned that they have the right to be loved and respected. 
The photos depict the lives and emotions of six men, who shared their stories in a series of interviews conducted by staff at the Center for Community Research and Development (CCRD) in Hanoi Vietnam. The project grew out of research on MSM, alcohol use, and sexual behavior conducted under a grant from the Research to Prevention (R2P) Project at the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health, managed by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs (CCP). The book was composed by these men with the support of experts from CCRD.
Within the framework of project, this photo book may not reflect the whole of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people (LGBT) community. However, we hope that this book will contribute to the general development of LGBT community.
We would like to quote a message that one main character wants to send to his parents:
“When I was born, Dad and mom were not selected gender for me and also no other’s choice. I was born naturally and it is not my parent’s fault: This is the real me. I hope my parents and others accept me and treat me as an ordinary person. Please do not hate me or hurt me… I hope people will have open view about the third world”.

 

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CCRD’s mission is to contribute to the improvement and equity of health care and social advancement for the Vietnamese people through a systematic and sustainable approach that combines sound knowledge, cultural sensitivity and capacity building.

Finding Ourselves